Ruger® Mark IV Product Safety Warning and Recall Notice Ruger Precision Rifle® Safety Bulletin
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Tell the CEO


Dear Loyal Ruger Customer,
Welcome to our new Tell the CEO!

As some of you may have heard, on May 9, 2017, I took over as the fourth CEO of Ruger - View Press Release. Although I am sad to see my good friend Mike Fifer retire, I am excited to be at the helm of such a great company! We have a rich history of amazing products, creative innovation and best-in-class customer service! Our rugged, reliable firearms are affordable, durable and, best of all, award-winning!

With more than 25 years in the firearms industry, working at two of the largest American manufacturers, I have learned that being connected with our customers is the most important aspect of a company's growth and success. So, I encourage you to reach out to me with any questions or comments that you may have. I assure you that I will read all of your comments and listen to your input. You may even hear back from me directly, or from one of our tremendous team members.

If you need help with your firearm, please be sure to reach out to our world-class customer service team directly. They represent some of our finest employees and are able to help resolve your concerns much faster than I can! There are some helpful FAQs below that you can also look through.

Thank you for your business and your loyalty!

Sincerely,
Chris Killoy

Service Related Issues

PLEASE NOTE: If you have a service related issue, please contact our Customer Service department directly to receive more immediate attention.

Chris's FAQs

Take a quick look through these FAQs to see if Chris has already answered your question! We've listed some of the most popular submissions with Chris's responses.

Why don't you offer a lifetime warranty like other manufacturers?
Unfortunately, the law in this area is complicated and varies widely. Rather than provide a written "lifetime warranty" followed by a lengthy disclaimer (which is what many manufacturers do), Ruger has elected not to provide a written warranty.
Regardless, we sincerely value our customers and work hard to treat them fairly. If you have a problem with your Ruger® firearm, reach out to one of our excellent customer service departments and I believe you will be very pleased with the result. If not, let me know.


What safety devices are incorporated into the design of the LCP II?
We put a significant amount of engineering effort into designing a short, crisp LCP® II firing mechanism that also is safe, reliable and consistent. We then verified the design through our robust testing process.

The LCP® II hammer and sear geometry were designed with significant engagement for a positive lockup. The sear is neutrally balanced and under strong spring tension, which helps prevent disengagement during a drop scenario. In the unlikely event that a significant shock to the pistol results in disengagement of the hammer from the sear, the design includes a hammer catch to help prevent the hammer from contacting the firing pin unless the trigger is pulled. Our testing has revealed that this design passes all standard tests and is very safe from discharge due to a drop.

Notably, the LCP® II design features a bladed trigger safety that prevents the trigger from moving rearward without intentionally being pulled. Every LCP® II is shipped from the factory with a pocket holster that protects the trigger when properly utilized.


Would it be possible to make the 10/22® in the .17 HMR at a comparable price?
We do not make any autoloading firearms in 17 HMR or 22 WMRF. There is great variability in the loading of these cartridges and, on a relative basis, brass casing that are weak for the pressures involved. Why? Because you need a case that is soft enough to ensure rimfire ignition, which is in conflict with the need for a case strong enough to handle magnum loadings. Since autoloading firearms generally do not have a locked bolt at ignition, there is a very slight, but real risk of a blown case. And no one wants that (and keep your hand out from under the magazine well on anybody's rimfire semi-auto).
If we can figure out an engineering solution to this conundrum, we'll bring one out, but for now it has us stumped. Sorry about that.
In the meantime, we do make bolt-action rifles for 17 HMR, 22 WMRF, and the new 17 WSM.


Retailers in my area are having a very hard time obtaining the Ruger Precision Rifle®. Is it on backorder, short supply, what? I am having a hard time understanding why Ruger is not getting these orders met.
We are working flat out to produce as many Ruger Precision Rifles as we can and we ship them every day. Demand is so strong, however, that I think we're actually falling further behind each day rather than catching up. We've committed more capital for equipment and tooling and brought in extra folks to work the production cell. It's a wonderful rifle, and well worth the wait, but I am sorry that it is taking so long to get enough out there to satisfy demand.


I really like the Ruger LC9s® Pro. I also like the Ruger LC380®. Can you tell me if Ruger has any plans to release a striker fired model of the LC380®?
Striker-fired guns are typically "cock-on-close" and, as a result, they require a recoil spring that is substantially stronger than the striker spring so that they can compress (cock) that spring when returning the slide into battery (on close). But the 380 is not powerful enough to reliably compress a recoil spring that is also strong enough to overcome the striker spring. So 380 is not a great choice for cock-on-close striker mechanism. Long-term, we may work on a cock-on-open striker-fired mechanism to try to overcome this shortfall.

Tell The CEO Comment Submission

Use the form below to communicate directly with Chris and let him know what ideas you have for new products and improvements at Ruger.
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